Today has been day two of the AjaxWorld conference and the two main topics on my agenda today were JavaScript and what Enterprises need.

The most delighting talks of the day were focusing entirely onto core Javascript. Douglas Crockford gave a really interesting session about “Javascript the good parts” and explained why JavaScript is as it is and why that sucks. He talked also about his code quality tool JSlint, that will help one to eradicate bad code and leave good code in place. He said he is sorry for the case that JSlint will hurt our feelings about code quality. As an example about bad code he showed and explained this nice example, which I will leave for you to find out why it sucks (or by Dougs book)

function a(){
return {
  ok: "hello"
}
}
 
function b(){
return
{
  ok: "hello"
}
}
 
alert(a().ok);
alert(b().ok); //wont work. you know why?

Mike Girouard followed that directly up with a really great presentation on why he things that JavaScript is really beautiful. I can really recommend checking his presentation.
It was refreshing to see with all the high level abstraction fancy stuff here and there that also people care for the nifty stuff of a language. I am getting into the joy of discovering more and more about Java and Javascript and really like that. I personally find that much more interesting than any high level abstraction, because the abstraction hide the beauty with too much make up :-)

Other sessions were addressing the issues we still have. Too many toolkits, too much useless technology. When companies want to utilize RIA to modernize their application infrastructure, they need something that we still need to invent.

Also this day had a negative highlight. A guy which I won’t name, from a company which I won’t name, had a general session in which he presented their product. Well he did the talking, but the slides were changed by his personal assistant. Also the demos were given by here. Well not actually given. She moved the mouse according where he said. I find this not acceptable, and not professional. Well it somehow fit to the arrogant presentation with the somewhat dubious content inside (“unfortunately eclipse does not provide debugging capabilities in production systems” – remote debugger anyone?)